Blog posts

User-centred design in diabetes technology development

In conversation with: Dr Parizad Avari, ST7 Registrar and Honorary Clinical Lecturer, working with Professor Nick Oliver in the Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College, London

What is your research project about and what stage are you at?

We are aiming to improve the lives of people living with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition which requires lifelong insulin therapy. The Horizon 2020 PEPPER (Patient Empowerment through Predictive PERsonalised decision support) project is a personalised decision support system to support self-management. The PEPPER app was designed for people with type 1 diabetes to manage their condition by providing personalised advice about insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake through artificial intelligence.

Dying Matters Week: Ensuring you and your loved ones are #InAGoodPlace at the end of life

This week we are highlighting an important cause – Dying Matters Awareness Week. Dying Matters is a campaign run by Hospice UK that aims to get us talking more openly about death, dying and bereavement. The focus of this year’s awareness week is on what it means to be #InAGoodPlace when we die. To be in a good place at the end life involves having your physical, emotional, financial and spiritual needs met and getting the right care and support. We can only achieve this if we get people thinking about, and talking through, their wishes for end of life care.

“How patients at different stages of the steroid weaning process helped to shape and design my research”

This entry is part [part not set] of 1 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Dr Katharine Lazarus, Diabetes and Endocrine Registrar and Clinical Research Fellow, working within the Section of Endocrinology and Investigative Medicine, Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London

What is your research project about and what stage are you at?

Steroid tablets, such as prednisolone are widely used to treat conditions such as asthma and arthritis. One in six people take steroids at any one time and one in 50 adults (approximately 1 million in the UK) take steroids for a prolonged period. 

Involving women to help shape a project exploring pregnancy care following weight-loss surgery

This entry is part [part not set] of 1 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Dr Saleem Ansari, Registrar in Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology, working within the Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, imperial College London

What is your research project about and what stage are you at?

My research aims to answer the question ‘What is the preferred weight-loss operation for women with obesity who are of child-bearing age.’

There are two main weight loss-operations, the ‘gastric bypass ‘and sleeve gastrectomy’. The gastric bypass operation is associated with complications during pregnancy such as early delivery and small babies, but whether these complications occur after sleeve gastrectomy is currently unknown.

National HIV Testing Week: Give HIV the Finger!

This week has marked National HIV Testing Week. This year’s campaign focusses on promoting regular testing among the most affected population groups, to reduce the number of people diagnosed late and living with undiagnosed HIV.

Why test for HIV?

People can live with HIV and display no symptoms for several years so testing is essential to know your HIV status. Being diagnosed as early as possible helps reduce transmission, allows you to start treatment early and ultimately improves health outcomes. With effective treatment, there is no risk of passing the virus on to sexual partners (Undetectable = Untransmittable).

Involving parents and carers in research about children’s healthcare experiences during covid-19

This entry is part [part not set] of 1 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Dr Kimberley Foley , a Postdoctoral Research Associate working within the Child Health Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health. Imperial College London

What did you do?

We invited parents and carers to a 2-hour online forum to share their experiences of accessing healthcare services for their children during the Covid-19 lockdown. Our research uses anonymised patient data collected from GP practices from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink in the UK. Our work is specifically looking at the number of times children and young people contacted their GP (in March to June 2020) compared to previous years.

Why has nobody asked us?! Our journey so far to co-produce research.

This entry is part [part not set] of 1 in the series Case studies

In conversation with Dr Helen Skirrow, National Institute Health Research Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow, Child Health Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London. and Lena Choudary-Salter, Founder and CEO of The Mosaic Community Trust

What is “Why has nobody asked us?” about?

“Why has nobody asked us?” aims to explore families’ experiences and perspectives of childhood vaccinations and is a co-production research project between Dr Helen Skirrow and The Mosaic Community Trust. In the UK, children living in poorer areas of big cities like London who belong to ethnic minorities or who do not speak English at home are less likely to be vaccinated however in previous research the voices of these families have often been missing.