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Student Wellbeing in IGHI Postgraduate Education and Mental Health Awareness Week:

The Institute of Global Health Innovation (IGHI) is proud to support the Mental Health Foundation this Mental Health Awareness Week – 13 to 19 May. Student Mental Health and Wellbeing (MH&W) has always been an area of focus of the Institute of Global Health Innovation’s Education department. Across its postgraduate courses, the majority of which are delivered online, the IGHI aims to train and develop future leaders in the healthcare sector. We currently host over 400 students studying on a range of post-graduate programmes within the Institute.

In early 2023, a team of Teaching Fellows within IGHI formed a working group to review and identify areas of development within our approach to supporting student mental health and wellbeing.

Climate Change and Mental Health: Insights from Connecting Climate Minds’ First Regional Dialogues 

As climate change continues to reshape our world, it’s not just landscapes that are transforming; the mental health of communities worldwide is also on the line. Over the past month, Connecting Climate Minds has been uniting global experts, researchers, and stakeholders in the diverse fields relevant to climate change and/or mental health from across the world. These discussions transcend borders, bringing together experts from seven regions of the world: Latin America and the Caribbean; Sub-Saharan Africa; Northern Africa and Western Asia; Central and South-Eastern Asia; Eastern and South-Eastern Asia; Oceania; and Europe and North America. The current field of mental health and climate change are disconnected and siloed, which reflects an urgent need to align research and action at the intersection of these two fields.

Design Dash: Accelerating innovation in NHS screening programmes

On your marks, get set… Our MSc Healthcare and Design students take part in a Design Dash, a rapid design process to solve a real-world healthcare challenge. We spoke to two students, Aoife McGrath and Jasmine Banerjee, about the process.

A design dash is a rapid, collaborative method for conceiving tangible healthcare innovations. Our Helix Centre teaches and assesses the Design Dash module on the MSc Healthcare and Design course that is aimed at healthcare professionals and designers and co-run by Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art. The students work with Helix Centre’s researchers, designers and public engagement experts on a live rapid design project to prototype a solution to an identified challenge.

Keeping OnTrack with stroke rehabilitation

The Helix Centre, part of the Institute of Global Health Innovation, is helping stroke patients to manage their recovery and increase their independence, with a wearable tool that provides support for the rehabilitation of their arm and hand.

OnTrack Rehab is a platform that combines tracking of arm movements through a smart watch with personalised virtual coaching and dedicated clinical support. The system allows stroke patients to convert every-day activities into productive rehabilitation, and stroke therapists to monitor and help guide the patients’ progress. The development of the platform has been led by a multidisciplinary team at Helix including Gianpaolo Fusari (Project Lead) and Clare McCrudden (Engagement Lead).

The cost of caring: How to support wellbeing in climate careers

Dr Emma Lawrance, Lead Policy Fellow for Mental Health, IGHI and Jessica Newberry Le Vay, Junior Policy Fellow in Climate Change and Health are part of Climate Cares.

In November 2022, we brought discussions about the interconnections between climate change and mental health and wellbeing to COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh in Egypt – at the 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference. This was only the second time that mental health has been a focus of COP events, with our COP26 Resilience Hub event the first, and overdue. We built new relationships with others who work in the climate change and mental health space, fostering community and collaboration.

Reducing isolation – using co-creation to get people living with dementia online

Our Helix Centre works to translate research into products that improve health outcomes. In this blog Alice Gregory, Designer at the Helix Centre, describes the creation of a ‘Digital Befriending Kit’ and toolkit as part of the Digital Inclusion Innovation Programme run by the Greater London Authority and the London Office for Technology and Innovation (LOTI). This blog was originally posted online by LOTI.

Digital health In settings of extreme adversity: improving quality of care for vulnerable populations

Improving the quality of healthcare delivery is a major priority around the world. However, the barriers to improving healthcare quality can vary significantly by context, environment, and population. In settings such as conflict-affected areas or areas of sustained humanitarian crisis, challenges to improving healthcare quality can be extremely complex. In this blog, the term settings of extreme adversity is used to describe these areas, but other terms such as fragile and conflict-affected and vulnerable states, have also been used in research. This blog is written by Olivia Lounsbury, Quality and Safety Programme Co-ordinator, John Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Using pulse oximetry to monitor COVID-19 patients at home

The beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic was riddled with clinical uncertainty. Technologies which could be used to monitor patients at home such as pulse oximeters were widely adopted by patients. But how safe is it to use a pulse oximeter at home when you have COVID-19? In this blog, we share IGHI’s experiences of being part of the COVID-19 Oximetry at Home Programme. This blog was written by Meesha Patel (Communications and Events Officer, IGHI) and Dr Ahmed Alboksmaty (former Research Associate, IGHI).

Setting the direction for mobile messaging in population screening

Mobile messaging has now become an essential tool to help healthcare services communicate and connect with patients. In a recent US study, 70.5% of patients surveyed used a form of text messaging to manage their general health. Not only are these messages a cost-effective, and convenient way of communicating, but they are also extremely versatile. In addition to reminding patients about upcoming appointments, they can be used to give endorsement, by highlighting your GP “recommends regular screening as an important health check” or to give medical updates. The latter was crucial during COVID-19 when access to physical services was limited.